An Exemplary “Model House” In Seoul, Korea

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Xi Gallery by Ken Min Architects, Seoul, Korea

The transitory nature of temporary buildings doesn’t always diminish the attention the architects give to the project’s design. The Xi Gallery by Ken Min Architects is an example of a specific type of building in Korea known as a “Model House.” Real estate developers use the structures to display the amenities of their building projects to potential buyers.

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Xi Gallery by Ken Min Architects, Seoul, Korea

Economically constructed out of reusable steel and modular panels, the buildings are typically torn down in three to five years. Ken Min Architects and their client used the opportunity to center the project on a public garden accessible to the surrounding neighborhood, addressing the area’s need for available green space. The building also incorporated an auditorium and educational rooms for programs open to the public.

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Xi Gallery by Ken Min Architects, Seoul, Korea

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More Than Just A Brick In The Wall

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House on Mount Anville by Aughey O’Flaherty Architects, Dublin

Building with brick is similar to walking. Placing one foot in front of the other eventually leads somewhere, just as putting one brick on top of the other ultimately leads to a built structure.

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Beyond the Screen by Office for Beyond Boundaries Architecture, Seoul, Korea

Architects and builders have used brick as a building material for thousands of years. The modular simplicity and relative cost effectiveness are still appealing in contemporary architecture. Curved walls and sun shades, or brise soleil, are made possible with clever applications.

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Lorong M Telok Kurau House by A D LAB Pte Ltd, Singapore

Beautiful Factories That Combine Architecture And Engineering

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FRABA Sp. z o.o. by BeL, Slubice, Poland

The Industrial Revolution of the 19th century, and the resulting technological innovations, changed architecture forever by producing materials that made construction more efficient, sturdier, and more adaptable. We also saw a change in the construction of the factory itself; pressures for productivity led administration to adhere to “scientific management” practices, placing an emphasis on work flow and environments.

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KOP Warehouses by URA, Puurs, Belgium

This new philosophy on workspace led to the disappearance of cramped, dimly lit interiors and prompted a focus on standardization. Modern factories ushered in open floor plans and a combination of steel, concrete, and glass to allow natural light onto the work floor. These changes in industrial architecture had an effect on residential architecture as well: modernist architects such as Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Buckminster Fuller were influenced by this new factory typology, and the idea of a home as a “machine for living” became an important concept.

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VW AutoTürme by HENN, Wolfsburg, Germany