An Australian Special Rural Property

Aus

Wall and Wall House by Dane Design Australia

Ecological stamps of approval in architecture can be a quick and easy way to gain some environmental cache. The Wall and Wall House in Australia isn’t LEED approved and doesn’t have bees on its roof, but the architect Dane Richardson has taken into careful account the integration of the building into its surrounding landscape.

Aus2

Wall and Wall House by Dane Design Australia

Located in Western Australia (a place that with the recent winter weather looks pretty good from the Architizer offices), the home is based on a building type known in the region as a Special Rural Property. These properties serve a purpose similar to a Gentleman’s Farm, providing a respite for the owners from the rigors of the urban environment. Since these estates are all about getting back to nature, it makes sense that the architectural design would take into account environmental concerns.

Read the complete article on Architizer here.

Aus1

Wall and Wall House by Dane Design Australia

Advertisement

Get Sun! Everything You Need To Know About Passive Solar Design

BridgeHouse

Bridge House by Max Pritchard Architect

Imagine freedom from paying your bills. Not all of them, of course. Just a few—namely gas, oil, and electric.

Building a house using passive solar design principles can allow the home to go off the grid for all or many heating and cooling needs. And, with today’s technologies and innovations, without sacrificing aesthetics or functionality.

Modern architects have harnessed the power of the sun since the 1930s. But it was rare: Builders struggled to integrate the beauty of architecture with the utilitarian aspect of engineering. It wasn’t until the oil and energy crisis of the ’70s forced architects to think of creative design solutions that solar passive techniques finally gained traction.

Read the complete article at Architizer here.

CliffHouse CliffHouse1

Cliff House by Altius Architecture, Inc

VashonIslandCabin

Vashon Island Cabin by Vandeventer + Carlander Architects