Architectural Spaces For Living And Working On Art

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Outpost by Olson Kundig Architects, Idaho

Architecture and art production have been inextricably linked since primitive humans began to paint in their caves. Artists need large, functional work areas that don’t encumber or restrict their creative endeavors—particularly when they’re creating, sleeping, and living in one space.

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01-390 House by Philippe SAMYN and PARTNERS, architects & engineers, Brussels, Belgium

The prominent minimalist and land artist Walter de Maria’s studio in Manhattan has just hit the market—asking price: $25 million. A former power company substation, it has many of the attributes artists desire in their live/work situations: large ceilings ranging between 13 to 25 feet; a vast open floor plan that can fit monumental sculptures or paintings; large windows that flood the space with natural light. A bathroom, kitchen, and bedroom, while modest, gave De Maria an area of respite from his daily artistic undertakings.

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Hendee-Borg House by William O’Brien Jr. LLC, United States

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Architectural Spaces For Jumpstarting Joy And Child’s Play

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Outdoors Indoors by BE-FUN Design, Shinagawa, Japan

Having the freedom and space for play is an important element of childhood development. During play, children explore and learn about themselves and their world and the first inklings of autonomy are reinforced. Considering that even simple objects such as an empty cardboard box can yield endless possibilities and hours of fun, imagine what can happen when architects design secure, stimulating spaces specifically for children.

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Eva’s Bed by h2o architectes, Paris, France

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Tepoztlán Lounge by Cadaval & Solà-Morales, Tepoztlán, Mexico