Chris Burden Gets Physical At The New Museum

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Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Dean Kaufman

What we talk about when we talk about Chris Burden feels inevitable. The bodily violence and confrontation of his early, conceptual works—which involved the artist being willfully shot in the arm, crucified to an automobile, and crawling on his belly using no hands through broken glass—dominate any conversation about him, despite the fact that he stopped staging these provocations nearly 40 years ago.

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Chris-Burden---Through-The-Night-Softly-(1973)

A new exhibition, “Extreme Measures,” at the New Museum in NYC, seeks to remedy that. Running through January 12, 2014, this career retrospectivedoesn’t ignore Burden’s performance-art roots. But it does put an emphasis on the sculptures and installations that have defined his work since the 1970s. The portrait it paints is not so much of a shock-jock provocateur, but of a multifaceted artist whose experimentations with materials and the built environment bring the conceptual ideas behind architecture and engineering to life.

Read the full article at Architizer here.

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“Mexican Bridge,” Chris Burden, 1998. Courtesy New Museum, New York. Photo: Benoit Pailley

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Getting Clean With Spectacular Bathing Designs

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Casa La Punta by  Elías Rizo Arquitectos

The bathroom is the epitome of a utilitarian space; we use it because we need to, grabbing a quick shower before we’re out the door to face another day. However, some bathrooms make a different statement altogether, expanding the parameters of the space to include relaxation and enjoyment. Collected below are some projects and products that add pleasure and leisure to the bathing experience.

Read the full article on Architizer here.

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DuraStyle Tubs by Duravit 

Awesome Frat House Architecture

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School starts Tuesday, and while we’ve previously featured architecture-school designdorms designed by starchitects, and buildings that actually make you want to go to class, there’s one architectural aspect of student life we have yet to discuss: the frat house.

Now, fraternities are not generally lauded in popular culture—thanks to all the hazing, underage alcohol use or abuse, and other issues that have plagued them in recent years. Aesthetically, they are even more poorly regarded. Just think of the quintessential image of a frat brother: a disheveled John Belushi in his “College” sweatshirt (or toga) raising a bottle of Jack Daniels to his lips while standing outside the dilapidated ruins ofDelta Tau Chi.

But while architects don’t often think about the fraternity house, there are some notable frat houses out there: architecturally, historically, and also for sheer gawking pleasure. Here, we present a brief survey or frat-house architecture, from the historically landmarked and the surprisingly modernist to the unabashedly tacky.

Read the full article on Architizer here.

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Image via.

Get Sun! Everything You Need To Know About Passive Solar Design

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Bridge House by Max Pritchard Architect

Imagine freedom from paying your bills. Not all of them, of course. Just a few—namely gas, oil, and electric.

Building a house using passive solar design principles can allow the home to go off the grid for all or many heating and cooling needs. And, with today’s technologies and innovations, without sacrificing aesthetics or functionality.

Modern architects have harnessed the power of the sun since the 1930s. But it was rare: Builders struggled to integrate the beauty of architecture with the utilitarian aspect of engineering. It wasn’t until the oil and energy crisis of the ’70s forced architects to think of creative design solutions that solar passive techniques finally gained traction.

Read the complete article at Architizer here.

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Cliff House by Altius Architecture, Inc

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Vashon Island Cabin by Vandeventer + Carlander Architects

The Honest Beauty of Shibui

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House EVTM by OYO

In August of 1960, House Beautiful published one of its most popular issues of all time, with a front page that read “Discover Shibui: The word for the highest level in beauty.” Elizabeth Gordon, the editor the magazine, wrote about shibui, saying it “describes a profound, unassuming, quiet feeling. It is unobtrusive and unostentatious. It may have hidden attainments but they are not paraded or displayed. The form is simple and must have been arrived at with an economy of means. Shibui is never complicated or contrived.” The Smithsonian Archive calls the issue “one of the most influential ever by a design magazine.”“Shibui” is a Japanese word used to describe a design aesthetic that values simple, unadorned minimalism. It is related to the concept of wabi-sabi, which is the celebration of the imperfect and transitory nature of objects in the world. The seven key components of shibui design are simplicity, implicitness, modesty, silence, naturalness, everydayness, and imperfection.

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La Muna by Oppenheim Architecture + Design

In August of 1960, House Beautiful published one of its most popular issues of all time, with a front page that read “Discover Shibui: The word for the highest level in beauty.” Elizabeth Gordon, the editor the magazine, wrote about shibui, saying it “describes a profound, unassuming, quiet feeling. It is unobtrusive and unostentatious. It may have hidden attainments but they are not paraded or displayed. The form is simple and must have been arrived at with an economy of means. Shibui is never complicated or contrived.” The Smithsonian Archive calls the issue “one of the most influential ever by a design magazine.”

Read the full article on Architizer here.

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House S by Grosfeld van der Velde architecten

An Amazing Visual Tour Of European Architectural Treasures

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Photo: Luke Shepard.

From the Renaissance until the middle of the 20th Century, artists from all over the globe would travel to Europe to pursue their trade—whether painting, sculpting, poetry, or architecture. This artistic rite of passage was known as the Grand Tour, as these cultural pilgrims traveled throughout the Continent in order to absorb what were considered the greatest works of art and architecture.

Luke Shepard, a precocious American photographer based out of Paris, has done a contemporary take on the Grand Tour, wandering through Europe photographing some of his favorite structures at night and turning it into a video named “Nightvision.”

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via Experiments in Motion

“Nightvision” includes many of the architectural icons that traveling Americans would have visited on a traditional Grand Tour of the past, such as the Roman Coliseum. But Shepard’s pilgrimage was more catholic than most, featuring such contemporary structures as Renzo Piano’s Shard in London, Calatrava and Candela’s L’Hemisferic in Valencia, and Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Bilbao.

Like all journeys, Shepard’s did have its bumps. “The biggest obstacle [my assistant and I] encountered was weather,” he said. “Rain and snow kept us from shooting many nights and set us back. … Furthermore, freezing temperatures brought about problems with numb fingers and toes. My lens frosted over on two occasions!”

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via Experiments in Motion

The whole project was completed on a shoestring budget with Shepard and his assistant living on trains and in hostels, on a budget of just $100 per day between the two of them. “We were nomads,” he said.

The result, however, was worth it: a stunning, rather moving grand tour through the Continent’s finest architectural monuments. Shepard’s favorite buildings in the video are the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul, and the Atomium in Brussels. Which buildings are your favorite?

NIGHTVISION from Luke Shepard on Vimeo.

Article originally appeared on Architizer here.

IKEA’s Virtual Reality App

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Last week we speculated about the ways in which digital technology will radically alter the way we think about, arrange, and decorate our interiors.Now, we’re one step closer to that future. A new technology, from Swedish furniture manufacturer Ikea, will eliminate our need for such archaic tools as measuring tape or at least expel any lingering doubts that the couch we just ordered will actually fit in our already lived-in living room.

Read the full article at Architizer here.